Lyme Disease Quackery – How to Spot a Quack

lyme disease quackery snake oilDevious marketing tactics, such as claiming that a therapy is ‘the cure that they want to keep secret’, or that a new treatment is a ‘miracle cure you can’t afford to ignore’, are commonplace in Lyme disease quackery. Secret overnight miracle breakthroughs should ring alarm bells for any patient and as hard as it is to resist those promising an easy route to cure all ills instantly it is better in the long-run to work within the bounds of the law and established medical practice to ensure safety. Resorting to quackery for Lyme disease also encourages more dubious practitioners to exploit patients, with people able to buy medical diplomas online and set themselves up as therapists with almost no medical knowledge and no idea what the Hippocratic Oath means.

A Miracle Cure for Lyme Disease

Another warning sign that a practitioner is a quack is the claim that their product can cure a wide variety of ailments and diseases, ranging from skin blemishes to cancer, or toothache to tuberculosis. Many quacks will also claim that their cures have no side-effects and are completely safe, which may be true in the sense that there is no effect to them at all other than delaying proper medical treatment. Looking at the history of quacks, realising how lucrative the term ‘doctor’ could be to boost sales, America suddenly had over 3500 doctors by 1775 with only 400 or so who had actually achieved a medical degree at university. Quackery is age-old, with examples of metallic disease-pulling rods dating back to the late 18th Century and numerous instances of quacks being very successful at peddling their unproven devices throughout the years.

Patient Dissatisfaction and Lyme Disease Quackery

The increasing amount of medical knowledge available to the layman means that quackery has become more sophisticated in recent times, progressing from simple magic tricks to products which bamboozle the customer with biomedical jargon that it takes a thorough grounding in medicine or science to really see through. Appealing to the disenchantment of many Lyme disease patients with the orthodox medical establishment is another key tactic in the quacks’ armory which has the unfortunate effect of undermining any respect for those organizations set up to protect public health.

Misrepresenting Evidence


Quacks will also often make use of scientific journals and papers not available to the general public or which have been selectively quoted to support a theory that is in fact refuted by the papers themselves or by other well-established medical opinion. Real medical breakthroughs are usually slow to reach the public because they must be rigorously tested to ensure initial findings were not down to simple chance or errors in the methodology. This delay provides a perfect opportunity for those preying on vulnerable patients awaiting a cure for their illness.

Made-Up Patient Testimonials

Often for lack of any actual scientific evidence to support the claims they make for their products, quacks will rely on patient testimonials to convince customers to part with their cash. These patients’ stories may be fictitious as many are presented anonymously or are courtesy of those paid to endorse the products. People taken in by quacks may be reluctant to admit their mistake and so there may be few dissenting voices warning against quacks until vast numbers of patients have been duped. It is important to note that not all quacks are in business for the money however, with some seeking fame and glory instead, or just the feeling of being needed by their often desperate customers who have exhausted all other means for the illness they recognise as Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease Quackery – Protecting Patients