Lyme Light Memoir Narrated by Natasha Lyonne, Star of Orange is the New Black

by lmatthews on July 12, 2014

lyme light memoir natalie londonThe Lyme disease memoir, Lyme Light, is garnering significant praise following its release last month and with a new trailer narrated by Natasha Lyonne this ‘illness memoir’ is sure to get even more attention.

Lyme Light describes the ordeal of Natalie London, a Canadian woman who was bedridden following a tick bite that infected her with Lyme disease bacteria. London is the vocalist and a multi-instrumentalist in the band Hey, King! and her account of suffering and recovering from Lyme disease is both harrowing and inspiring, suffused as it is with her trademark humour.


London was about to graduate from Columbia University and was all set to embark on musical stardom, with meetings set up with major record labels, when she began to experience a range of unexplained symptoms. This vibrant young woman found her memory failing her, her limbs betraying her, and in addition to becoming bedridden, unable to walk, she could no longer read, write or talk.

The memoir has been compared to works by Dave Eggers, Augusten Burroughs, Chuck Klosterman and David Sedaris due to its wry humour and wit. London’s suffering at the hands of Borrelia burgdorferi make for a gripping tale but don’t, like many Lyme disease memoirs, get bogged down by despair, loneliness and conspiracy theories.

Following her recovery, London’s band performed last month at a sold-out concert where she launched the memoir. The proceeds from the concert were donated to the Tick-Borne Disease Alliance and Lyme Light looks pretty set to boost awareness of the potentially tragic consequences of this infection. The audiobook is to be released later this year and will be narrated by the Orange is the New Black star Natasha Lyonne, in her distinctive world-weary but humorous voice.

Lyme Light: A Memoir definitely adds a new and exciting voice to the fight to improve awareness of Lyme disease. Here’s hoping that by exposing more people to information on this infection, earlier diagnoses can be made, better treatments can be pursued, and a new Lyme disease vaccine can be created to minimise suffering from a preventable and treatable infection.

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